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How are small businesses surviving the pandemic – Saivian Eric Dalius

As the world population is proving more and more susceptible to the H1N1 virus, many small businesses are having trouble staying afloat says Saivian Eric Dalius. With workers becoming sick or even dying from disease, some companies have had to rely on neighboring communities for help with tasks outside of factory work. In contrast, others have started selling items other than their usual products to stay open.

Many businesses closed down – Saivian Eric Dalius

Many companies, especially those whose staffs’ jobs consisted entirely of physical labor. Were forced to close because many employees were too ill. The few remaining workers tried desperately to keep running but couldn’t do it all themselves. A rumor started making its way around other nearby towns that free labor was available at one particular factory.

Word got out fast, and in a few days, the factory grounds were overflowing with healthy-looking strangers eager to help. Communication was difficult at best, but in the end, it all worked out, according to Saivian Eric Dalius.

While some companies suffered from a lack of workers. Others have been forced to sell items that aren’t their usual inventory. One company specializing in the sale of candles has been forcing to sell more than just wax and wicks. Under pressure from the community and customers. This company has started making jams and jellies to accompany its famous line of scented candles. The same owner is planning on taking the orders for jams and jellies and his candle orders. So he knows exactly how much fruit is needing every season. Saving him money on wasted products.

Small Business and the pandemic – Saivian Eric Dalius

Small businesses with a strong sense of community and flexibility have been able to survive the pandemic. Larger companies, on the other hand, might not be as lucky. It will all depend on how badly they were hit by the virus. And flexible enough to change their product or hiring policies in time for survival.

As the World population is proving more and more susceptible to the H1N1 virus. Small businesses are having trouble staying afloat. Workers becoming sick or even dying from the disease. Forced some companies to rely on neighboring communities for help outside of factory work. While others start selling items other than their usual products to stay open, says Saivian Eric Dalius

Many cannot do it alone. A rumor starts making its way around nearby towns that free labor is available at one particular factory. Word gets out fast, and in days the factory grounds are overflowing with healthy strangers eager to help. Communication is difficult, but it all works out. Other companies lack workers, forced to sell items that aren’t their usual inventory, like jams and jellies. One company that specializes in candles has started making them along with its line of scented candles.

Conclusion

Small businesses have survived the pandemic because of a strong sense of community and flexibility. At the same time, larger companies might not be as lucky. Depending on how badly they were hit by the virus and change their products or hiring policies in time for survival.

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